October 26: Physical & Emotional Suffering at the End of Life

$35.00

Date:
Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Time:
0900 PT | 1000 MT/SK | 1100 CT | 1200 ET | 1300 AT

Duration:
120 minutes including a Q&A

Includes:
• A certificate of completion
• The live webinar event if registering prior to commencement
• The on-demand recording to watch at your convenience
• A handout in PDF format for viewing or self-printing

See below for the outline, speaker biography, and more.

SKU: Palliative 1 Categories: , , , Tag:

Description

Date:
Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Time:
0900 PT | 1000 MT/SK | 1100 CT | 1200 ET | 1300 AT

Duration:
120 minutes including a Q&A

Includes:
• A certificate of completion
• The live webinar event if registering prior to commencement
• The on-demand recording to watch at your convenience
• A handout in PDF format for viewing or self-printing

Objectives:
•  Identify issues contributing to suffering experienced by patients requiring palliative and end-of-life care and their families and describe approaches to address these.
• Understand and recognize the concept of “total pain” and become aware of how physical, psychological, social, emotional and spiritual concerns each contribute to the pain experience
• Describe appropriate approaches to treatment of “total pain” for patients and families using a multi-modal approach.
• Identify why patients at the end of life may request MAiD (Medical Assistance in Dying) and describe approaches to respond to a patient’s or family’s request for hastened death.
• Demonstrate awareness of the current MAiD legislation within Canada.

Description:
Every person dies. The main goal of Palliative Care is to help patients achieve the best possible quality of life right up until the end of life. In this webinar, several timely issues will be discussed: approaches to suffering and the pain experience of patients; the concept of “total pain” and approaches to its treatment; addressing physical, psychological, social, emotional and spiritual concerns of patients; why patients may request medical assistance in dying (MAiD) and how to respond; and finally, to review the Canadian laws around medical assistance in dying.

Who Should Attend?:
• Physicians, Palliative Care Nurses, Oncology Nurses, Hospice Nurses,
Home Care Nurses, Primary Care Nurses, End of Life Doulas
• Nurse Practitioners, Medical Surgical Nurses, Geriatric Nurses, Transition Coordinators
• Pharmacists, Medical Social Workers, Tele-Health Nurses, Chaplins

Valerie Cooper,  MN, NP-Adult, CHPCN[C]

Valerie Cooper is a Hospice Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner with Home and Community Care Support Services South East Ontario. She sees patients in their homes in a variety of geographies, from urban to remote. She works in a shared-care model with patients’ existing primary care providers to support patients with malignancies and end-stage organ diseases to die in their preferred place of death.

She lectures in the undergraduate program at Queen’s School of Nursing and has developed and taught an elective undergraduate course on hospice palliative care nursing. She has also contributed to a continuing education course for nurse practitioners on palliative care through the University of Toronto. Valerie is a member of the Dying with Dignity Canada’s Clinician Advisory Council, as well as many Communities of Practice related to both Palliative and End-of-Life Care and Medical Assistance in Dying. She recently became co-chair of the NPAO Palliative and End of Life Care Community of Practice