July 19: What’s in a Name? MIS-C, PIMS-TS, & Kawasaki Disease in the Era of COVID-19

$35.00

Date:
Monday, July 19, 2021

Time:
0900 PT | 1000 MT/SK | 1100 CT | 1200 ET | 1300 AT

Duration:
120 minutes including a Q&A

Includes:
• A certificate of completion
• The live webinar event if registering prior to commencement
• The on-demand recording to watch at your convenience
• A handout in PDF format for viewing or self-printing

See below for the outline, speaker biography, and more.

SKU: Covid Peds 1 Categories: , , , Tag:

Description

Date:
Monday, July 19, 2021

Time:
0900 PT | 1000 MT/SK | 1100 CT | 1200 ET | 1300 AT

Duration:
120 minutes including a Q&A

Includes:
• A certificate of completion
• The live webinar event if registering prior to commencement
• The on-demand recording to watch at your convenience
• A handout in PDF format for viewing or self-printing

Objectives:
• To review the clinical spectrum presenting as MIS-C
• To apply lessons learned from Kawasaki Disease to COVID-associated hyperinflammation in children
• To review lessons learned from the international MIS-C experience
• To review the emergency department evaluation for children with suspected MIS-C
• To review the in-patient management pathway for children with suspected MIS-C
• To review out-patient follow-up for children with MIS-C

Description:
Children presenting with COVID-19 associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), with hyperinflammation-like Kawasaki disease (KD), have dominated public discussion during the COVID pandemic. Cases of COVID-19-associated hyperinflammation/KD/shock have been reported worldwide, many with KD or KD-like presentation and often requiring ICU admission. This syndrome was initially coined “Paediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome Temporally associated with COVID-19” (PMIS-TS), by the Royal College of Paediatric and Child Health in the UK. Different names and case definitions have been issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the USA, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, and the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS). The name “MIS-C” is now used by the WHO and CDC, adding to the definitions debate and difficulty with direct comparisons between countries. Common elements to all definitions are prolonged fever, (multi)-organ dysfunction, and laboratory evidence of hyperinflammation. The CPS case definition casts a wider net and acknowledges the reality that serologic testing for SARS-CoV-2, a requirement in some definitions, is not readily available in Canada. Although many questions remain, we do know that hyperinflammation syndrome (KD/MIS-C/PIMS) is temporally associated with COVID-19, and that there is a wide spectrum of clinical disease ranging from: 1) Shock, cytokine storm syndrome and multiorgan involvement) to 2) KD and 3) Fever and hyperinflammation. We will review the spectrum of clinical presentation and investigative algorithm and management pathways proposed to help direct clinical care of children with suspected MIS-C/KD.

Who Should Attend?:
• Physicians, Residents, Nurses and Allied Health Personnel in Pediatric, Emergency, and Critical Care settings
• Physicians, Residents, Nurses and Allied Health Personnel in COVID Units
• RNs, NPs, RPNs, & LPNs in pediatic, community, and primary settings
• Infection Control Practitioners, Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, Child Life Specialists
• Dentistry personnel, Physician Assistants, Dietitians, Pharmacy personnel
• Nurse Practitioners, Tele-Health Nurses, Healthcare Educators & Managers

Dr. Rae Yeung, MD, PhD, FRCPC

Dr. Rae Yeung is a Professor of Paediatrics, Immunology, and Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto. At the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Dr. Yeung holds the Hak-Ming and Deborah Chiu Chair in Translational Paediatric Research and is a Senior Scientist in Cell Biology and Scientific Director of its Biobank. Dr. Yeung’s research aims to understand the mechanisms governing autoimmunity, specifically the mechanisms involved in initiating and sustaining the immune response. Dr. Yeung is leading both national and international efforts to understand the biologic basis for heterogeneity in childhood arthritis and rheumatic diseases towards personalized treatment decisions for affected children. She is the founding chair of CAPRI (Canadian Alliance of Paediatric Rheumatology Investigators) and UCAN (Understanding Childhood Arthritis Network), a translational research network collectively representing over 300 sites from 50 countries.